Heartbreaking Bravery

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Tag: Pedro the Lion

January 2019: The Best Songs, Music Videos, and Full Streams

We’re more than a third of the way through 2019 and the editorial branch of this site has been far too dormant since 2018 received the Best Of recap treatment. Today will be dedicated to addressing that coverage gap with three look backs at the very best songs, music videos, and full streams that January, February, and March had to offer. Due to the sheer volume of highlighted material, these lists will (unfortunately) be static, presented on their own without any dedicated write-ups. Each of these releases is exceptional and may receive some more words further down the line but for now, simply revisit and enjoy: The Best of January 2019.

SONGS

And The Kids – No Way Sit Back

The Murder Capital – Feeling Fades

Potty Mouth – 22

Westkust – Swebach

Francie Moon – Present Tense

Rosie Tucker – Gay Bar

MUSIC VIDEOS

Eyesore and the Jinx – On an Island

Mike Krol – What’s the Rhythm

Better Oblivion Community Center – Dylan Thomas

La Dispute – Footsteps at the Pond

Bellows – What Can I Tell You About the World?

PUP – Kids

FULL STREAMS

Mike Krol – Power Chords


Better Oblivion Community Center – Better Oblivion Community Center

Cat Inside – Rewind

Tørsö – Build and Break

Girlpool – What Chaos Is Imaginary

Hollow Comet – Hollow Comet

Pedro the Lion – Phoenix

The Best Music Videos of October 2018

Today will be spent going over the best songs, music videos, and records of the past two months, each individual section divided up into respective month and format. The songs of October have been handled so it’s time to turn the attention towards the month’s notable music videos. From emergent acts to reunited powerhouses, the five selections below run an interesting gamut but it’s a spectrum well worth exploring.

1. Swearin’ – Grow Into A Ghost

Special orders of the most recent Swearin’ record came with customized “Illusion-O” 3D glasses. The glasses were to be used for the viewing of the two music videos, which coincided with the record’s release. “Grow Into A Ghost” makes expert use of this tactic, full of visual pop even without the glasses, leaning into a ’50s sensibility to great effect. A testament to the band’s creative strength, “Grow Into A Ghost” suggests Swearin’ have a firm grip on their future.

2. Flasher – Material

Flasher‘s “Material” is the type of music video that seems designed to provoke severe reactions. From the intentional, tongue-in-cheek subversion of the song itself to the manipulation of the actual viewing process, “Material” is a risky gambit. The cumulative effect pays that risk off as the clip devolves into territory that’s typically occupied by late night Adult Swim viral insanity. While it can occasionally be difficult to watch, “Material” is even more difficult to forget.

3. didi – Haru

didi take their strain of ’90s revivalism to new heights on the clip for “Haru”, fully embracing the visual aesthetics that defined the slacker punk videos of that era. Rough, grainy, overflowing with light colors, and strewn with cheap effects, “Haru” is a throwback fever dream. Acutely self-aware and teeming with a vibrant energy, the Alex Bolcher-directed clip will be sure to turn a few heads.

4. Pedro The Lion – Yellow Bike

One of the more unexpected reunions of 2018 came in the form of Pedro the Lion. A band revered by critics and audiences alike, David Bazan‘s relaunched project has been facing incalculable scrutiny. “Yellow Bike” is one of the band’s first forays back into the public conscience and arrived accompanied by a heartfelt music video that perfectly caters to the band’s sensibilities. Quietly moving and full of promise, “Yellow Bike” stands as an important entry of a storied career.

5. Casper Skulls – O My Enemy

Taking a break from harsh noise and confrontational, pointed visuals, Casper Skulls opt for a scenic detour on the Melanie St-Pierre video for the tender elegy, “O My Enemy”. Opening on an illustration of a small child curled up into the fetal position, small bursts of animation begin to spread outward, surrounding the central figure with softness and life. The clip never stops morphing, allowing the child to quietly fold into a flower, all the while “O My Enemy” provides the soundtrack and conjures a startlingly emotional effect. Simple and very nearly overwhelming, “O My Enemy” more than proves the worth of artistic concepts.