Heartbreaking Bravery

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Tag: Mute

Iceage – Against the Moon (Stream)

iceage

There are days where it can be difficult to scrounge up enough great new releases to warrant an introductory paragraph round-up and there are days that are so generously overflowing with great material it’s nearly impossible to figure out what to feature. Today fell squarely to the latter. There were no less than four outstanding releases in each of the major categories: single stream, music video, and full stream. Cool Ghouls’ psych-laced basement pop rager “And It Grows” gave some new promise to the upcoming record. Mean Creek‘s Chris Keene unveiled the most recent look at his Dream Generation project with the sparse “The Four of Us” and September Girls teased their upcoming EP with the snarling “Veneer“. Veronica Falls‘ James Hoare and Mazes‘ Jack Cooper started a new project called Ultimate Painting, who instantly turned some heads with the carefree open-road ramblings of “Ten Street“.

Over in the realms of the music video, Grubs, Frankie Teardrop (warning: heavy strobes), and Cloud Nothings all released clips defined by lo-fi experementalism while Snævar Njáll Albertsson’s Dad Rocks! project dipped its toes into a gorgeously-lensed narrative involving a heavy existentialist crisis with “In the Seine”. In the space occupied by full streams, Dark Blue offered up their heavy-hitting Album of the Year contender Pure Reality and Tomorrows Tulips did the same for their career-best effort, When. Ex-Breathers made all 12 tracks (and 11 minutes) of their vicious upcoming 7″, ExBx, available for the world to hear, while Zola Jesus occupied similarly dark but incrementally softer territory with her upcoming effort, Taiga. A Winged Victory For The Sullen rounded out the full streams with another ambient near-masterpiece titled Atomos. Of course, there was one another full stream- but the link is being withheld until it’s accompanied by a forthcoming review. In the meantime, today’s focus will be on the song that defines that record: “Against the Moon”.

In an effort not to mince words, one thing should be noted before going any further- namely that Plowing Into The Field of Love is a masterpiece. No record this year has seen a more stunning creative growth or felt more important than Iceage’s new behemoth. Only three records into their still-young career and they’ve already emerged with a full-length that not only operates as a radical left turn but one that rivals anything from the creative rebirth of Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds (or, the Let Love In era). Iceage’s first two records, New Brigade and You’re Nothing, were menacing works that a few people chalked up to exhilarating exercises in intimidation. On Plowing Into The Field Of Love the band relents from that approach and serves a hyper-literate Southern Gothic-indebted masterwork that sees them flexing boldly experimental muscle and an untapped well of what now appears to be endless ambition. No song on Plowing Into The Field of Love illustrates this more than the slow-burning “Against the Moon”, a song that’s well out of the confines of anything the band’s ever done but still feels wholly suited to their identity.

Opening with the quasi-mournful strains of a brass section, it quickly undercuts its brief introduction with shuffling drums and the sustained hums of a chord organ. In those opening 15 seconds, the band manages to establish an astounding grasp on a style that was previously completely foreign to them. By the time the string and piano arrangements kick “Against the Moon” up a few levels into the breathtakingly sublime, it’s one of the bravest things any band this year’s committed to a studio recording. As instrumentally thrilling as “Against the Moon” is, it’s the startling emergence of vocalist Elias Bender Rønnenfelt’s vulnerability that shifts the song from the sublime to the transcendental. For the first time, Rønnenfelt’s lyrics and vocals are given a platform that demands the listener’s unwavering attention and that level of investment is paid off in full. From the song’s arresting opening stanza, enhanced by Rønnenfelt’s world-weary drawl, it’s clear that his personal transition directly correlates with what the band’s accomplished in terms of musicality. “On a pedestal, shining bright. Justify me. Make me right. I can fight it; make it roam- but a fugitive has a tendency to return home.” is the kind of opening line that suggests a genuinely great writer- that the rest of Iceage seems to have embraced and experienced the same level of maturity and rapid artistic growth as Rønnenfelt in the short year that’s followed You’re Nothing is nothing short of mind-bending.

A song that literally arrives with horns, “Against the Moon” stands as Iceage’s definitive entry into the band’s sudden new era, the strongest representation of Plowing Into The Field Of Love‘s myriad of sudden changes, and one of the most immediately striking songs to emerge from the past 4 years. Stripped back far enough to be completely exposed, Iceage shows the world all of its scars, all of its imperfections, and all of its entire being- and it’s a tremendous thing to experience. Even considering all of their previous sonic aggression, nothing they’ve ever produced has hit with a fiercer impact. For a band that’s aim has always been to wound, it’s a devastating reverse that leaves them sounding wounded- but bravely resilient. It’s extraordinarily effective and unflinchingly courageous. Most importantly, “Against the Moon” is the crown jewel of what deserves be regarded as one of this decade’s most important records. Make sure to give this the attention it deserves.

Listen to “Against the Moon” below, pre-order Plowing Into The Field Of Love from Matador here, and keep an eye on this site for a full review at some point in the coming week.

Diarrhea Planet – Babyhead (Music Video)

It was an unusually active on the streams-and-music videos front for a Friday and today saw the releases of several great entries in both categories. There was the Stereogum premiere of a new Geronimo! rager, the first glimpse of the forthcoming Swans record, and another promising glimpse at Dark Arc– Saintseneca’s upcoming Anti- debut, courtesy of Clash Music. Additionally, there were some noteworthy music videos, including both the NSFW blood-hued nightmare dreamed up for WTCHS’ “Over Kilmer” and the welcoming psychedelic haze of Night Beats’ “Hidden Circle“. While all of that is definitely worth looking into, today belonged to one thing and one thing only: Diarrhea Planet’s gloriously inspired video for I Am Rich Beyond Your Wildest Dreams standout “Babyhead”.

Really, sometimes there just aren’t words to do justice to an experience. All that can really be said at this point is that everyone else attempting to make ‘The Year’s Best Video’ should probably just call it quits now and wait until January rolls around. Confused? Good. Not confused, just intrigued? Even better. Watch it below and become the most enlightened person on the face of the planet. And people say rock n’ roll is dead.

Liars – Mess On A Mission (Stream)

Liars are one of the most tirelessly unpredictable bands going right now. Don’t believe it? Go through their discography in chronological order and try to figure out how they’ve held onto a distinct sound while shape-shifting into a multitude of different genres. They’ll always have art-punk influences in their corner but at what point does their electronic fetish take over as their primary influence? It’s anyone’s best guess, really, and “Mission” continues to make it impossible to definitively pinpoint what the band is exactly. Fortunately, this allows the band to never grow stale; their endless pursuit of something different ensures that they’re always miles away from the laws of diminishing returns.

Today the band announced several key components in their upcoming March release (their follow-up to the excellent WIXIW), which will be entitled Mess. They also unveiled the album art (pictured above) and lead-off single/sort-of title track “Mess On A Misson”, which can be heard below. “Mess On A Mission” doesn’t sacrifice an ounce of the band’s nervous tension and encapsulates their artistic restlessness extraordinarily well. It also gets better on every subsequent revisit. Mess will be available on March 24th via Mute. Get excited.