Heartbreaking Bravery

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Tag: Music

Dentist – Joel (Stream)

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Monday tends to be one of the more eclectic release days for standalone streams and today proved to be no different. Worthwhile material emerged from just about every genre this site typically covers and continued to stretch some boundaries. The following artists all had songs that deserved to be heard: Consilience, Jackal Onasis, Gap Dream, Sweat, Scarlett Saunders, Cheena, Possible Humans, Ranch Ghost, Above Top Secret, and The Meltaways. In addition to those releases, a small handful of notable music videos from angelic milk, Wireheads, Haley Bonar, Preoccupations, and Ali Beleitc also saw the light of day.

Dentist’s surf-tinged “Joel” wound up securing the feature spot by virtue of sheer strength. Opening up on a foreboding riff and staccato chord stabs awash in reverb, “Joel” sets an intriguing — and oddly compelling —  tone at its onset. Slowly, the guitar fades and gives way to a creeping piano figure that injects the song with an eerie Southern Gothic sensibility. Then, after a brief rest, the song snaps into a sugary overdrive that kicks the energy up from 15 to 80 in an instant.

Following the switch, Dentist falls comfortably into a groove that operates as a pastiche of pop influences from decades long gone. It’s a perfect transition that illustrates the band’s understanding of their craft, suggesting that Dentist’s forthcoming Ceilings may be one of 2016’s most unexpected joys. Apart from the invigorating dynamic shifts of “Joel”, the song’s vibrant second act endearingly instills the song with a surplus of giddy joy. “Joel” ultimately goes from bleakly intimidating to openly welcoming, leaving one hell of an imprint in the process.

It’s another entry in an already-long string of unlikely summer anthem candidates, carefree and just about perfect.

Listen to “Joel” below and pre-order Ceilings from Little Dickman here.


[Editor’s Note: The beginning of coverage in 2016 was an extremely hectic time and one odd quirk of this site was overlooked. That particular oversight will be amended in this post, which precedes the resumption of posting the 100 immediately preceding entries in the continuously-expanding Heartbreaking Bravery catalog of posts. A few of the image links are broken and some of the galleries are missing but all of them will eventually make the migration to Heartbreaking Bravery’s flickr. Keep an eye out.]

To access posts 700-799, click on the links listed below.

HB700: Wrap Up Warm (Mixtape)
HB701: Ronnie Stone & The Lonely Riders – ❤ Race. Cold Sweat. Nu Dance. Do It. (Glassio Remix Premiere)
HB702: Phooey! – Molly’s at the Laundromat (Song Premiere)
HB703: Idle Bloom – Pride Line (Stream, Live Video)
HB704: METZ – Spit You Out (Music Video)
HB705: Alex G – Brite Boy (Music Video)
HB706: Dilly Dally – The Touch (Music Video)
HB707: Dusk – Too Sweet (Music Video)
HB708: Watch This: Vol. 108
HB709: Watch This: Vol. 109
HB710: Watch This: Vol. 110
HB711: Patio – Patio Songs (Demo Review, Stream, Live Video)
HB712: PURPLE 7 – Garden Eyes (Album Review, Stream)
HB713: Milk Crimes – Milk Crimes (EP Review, Stream)
HB714: Bad Wig – Bad Wig (EP Review, Stream, Live Video)
HB715: Beliefs – Colour of Your Name (Stream)
HB716: Bruising – Honey (Stream)
HB717: Lucy Dacus – I Don’t Wanna Be Funny Anymore (Stream)
HB718: Mothers – Too Small For Eyes (Stream)
HB719: Birth (Defects) – Ascetic (Stream)
HB720: Casket Girls – Deep Time (Stream)
HB721: Two Inch Astronaut – Good Behavior (Stream)
HB722: bed. – The Rule (Stream)
HB723: Dark Blue – Delco Runts (Stream)
HB724: A Short Review (Live Video Compilation
HB725: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. I
HB726: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. II
HB727: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. III
HB728: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. IV
HB729: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. V
HB730: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. VI
HB731: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. VII
HB732: 2015: The Best of Watch This
HB733: 15 of ’15: The Best EP’s of 2015
HB734: 15 of ’15: The Best Music Videos of 2015
HB735: 15 of ’15: The Best Odds and Ends of 2015
HB736: 15 of ’15: The Best Songs of 2015
HB737: 15 of ’15: The Best Albums of 2015
HB738: The Honorable Mentions of the 2015 Music Categories
HB739: The Best Scenes of 2015
HB740: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Loren DiBlasi)
HB741: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Lindsey-Paige McCloy)
HB742: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Sabyn Mayfield)
HB743: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Nicola Leel)
HB744: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Lindsay Hazen)
HB745: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Tica Douglas)
HB746: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Fred Thomas)
HB747: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Phil McAndrew)
HB748: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Isabel Reidy)
HB749: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jessica Leach)
HB750: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Sami Martasian)
HB751: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Ben Grigg)
HB752: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Amanda Dissinger)
HB753: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Bella Mazzetti)
HB754: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (David Anthony)
HB755: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jamie Coletta)
HB756: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Chris Sutter)
HB757: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (John Rossiter)
HB758: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Cole Kinsler)
HB759: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Megan Manowitz)
HB760: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Gabriela June Tully Claymore)
HB761: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Stephen Tringali)
HB762: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Alisa Rodriguez)
HB763: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Toby Reif)
HB764: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (100%)
HB765: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Amelia Pitcherella)
HB766: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Katie Bennett)
HB767: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Miranda Fisher)
HB768: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Christine Varriale)
HB769: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Sam Clark)
HB770: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Julia Leiby)
HB771: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Kelly Johnson)
HB772: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jessi Frick)
HB773: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Nicholas Cummins)
HB774: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Lily Mastrodimos)
HB775: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jerard Fagerberg)
HB776: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Athylia Paremski)
HB777: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Eric Slick)
HB778: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (David Glickman)
HB779: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Ryan Wizniak)
HB780: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories
HB781: WASHA – Bury Our Love (Music Video Premiere)
HB782: 2016: The First Two Months (Streams)
HB783: 2016: The First Two Months (Full Streams)
HB784: 2016: The First Two Months (Music Videos)
HB785: Introducing: Ubetcha
HB786: Inside Voices – Nomad:Begin (Song Premiere)
HB787: Watch This: The Honorable Mentions of 2016’s First Quarter
HB788: Horse Teeth – Dark & Gloomy (Song Premiere)
HB789: March 2016: The Full Streams
HB790: March 2016: The Music Videos
HB791: March 2016: The Streams
HB792: Ladada – Hi Five (EP Premiere)
HB793: The 50 Best Songs of 2016’s First Quarter
HB794: The Nudes – Nowhere To Be (Song Premiere)
HB795: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. I
HB796: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. II
HB797: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. III
HB798: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. IV
HB799: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. V

Tenement – Morning Mouth (Stream)

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Over the course of my interest in music, particularly music that resided within the confines of DIY, no band’s meant more to me than Tenement. Back when the band spent their time running shows out of the sorely-missed BFG house, I’d be there at every possible opportunity- but that’s skipping ahead of the beginnings of the story. Back in 2008, I booked Tenement to play a small coffee shop that frequently hosted shows on not much more than a whim. It was one of the first shows I ever had a hand in booking and it immediately became one of the most memorable- not just for that reason- but because what Tenement left up on that small stage (one they invited the entire crowd onto) was something I’d spent years looking for: a band more punk than pop who were at least somewhat defined by a sense of well-informed literacy.

In subsequent reviews (across various publications) that I wrote about Tenement’s music, I’d frequently compare guitarist/vocalist Amos Pitsch’s exacting sense of detailed Americana to authors like John Steinbeck. In lyric copy, Pitsch frequently zeroes in on the mundane aspects of everyday life that too frequently go unexamined (and, subsequently, uncelebrated). While this is an aspect of the band’s music that’s gained an unbelievable amount of clarity over the years, its characteristically humble beginnings can be heard in songs like the fiery “Morning Mouth”, which is one of a handful of songs the band’s remastered for an upcoming early music compilation entitled Bruised Music: Vol. 1. Incidentally, “Morning Mouth” was the second song I ever saw the band live- and the one that immediately convinced me I had a new favorite band.

Spending some time at The BFG always reaffirmed my earliest suspicious about Tenement after that show- the band’s versatility was shaped in part by their extremely diverse listening habits. It was impossible to spend thirty seconds flipping through any one of the thousands of releases that littered that house and not jump from 80’s hardcore to free jazz session recordings to sludge to the golden era of soul, all of which would be directly underneath an unending murderer’s row of killer flyers for (increasingly strong) bills that the house hosted. It evoked the ideal of the American melting pot more than just a little and, in a way, furthered the band’s identity. All of that, the feeling of sense and place, comes back as acutely as possible when revisiting a song like “Morning Mouth”- it’s undeniably indicative of the promise Tenement continues to fulfill and exceed while remaining a powerhouse in its own right.

Surprisingly intricate passages of “Morning Mouth”, which was originally released on the False Teeth 7″, revealed the band’s enviable talents at an early stage of their career while also betraying the band’s songwriting mastery. Hooks followed hooks, always with the momentum of a sledgehammer blow to the gut, while the band seemed to be on the verge of spiraling towards an unimaginable ascension. Burning bridges, a keen sense of surroundings, and an absolutely vicious musical performance are some of the more defining elements of “Morning Mouth”, which remains the warning shot that convinced me that Wisconsin had a band worthy of staggering levels of admiration. It may not have been the band’s only early warning shot but it remains one that holds a significant amount of power to this day. Who knew indulging nostalgia could be so invigorating?

Watch that early performance on a stage full of people below, listen to the Stereogum premiere of the remaster here, and pre-order Bruised Music: Vol. 1 from Grave Mistake (in collaboration with Toxic Pop) here.

Mutts – Black Ties & Diamonds (Song Premiere)

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Chicago trio Mutts have been steadily building a deeply impressive resume for over five years. Each time the band steps up to the plate, they improve on their previous best- leaving 2013’s extraordinary (acoustic-based) Object Permanence as their current high-water mark. As unlikely as it seems considering Object Permanence‘s unfailing grace, the record they’re about to release- Fuel Yer Delusion vol. 4– may surpass it to take up the mantle of career-best. “Everyone Is Everyone” kicked off the pre-release roll-out for Fuel Yer Delusion vol. 4 in exhilarating fashion with bandleader Mike Maimone passionately dismantling the politics of negative slurs- a stance that takes on a much more personal meaning considering Maimone spent the last few records grappling with the anxieties and emotional releases that accompanied his decision to come out.

“Black Ties & Diamonds” may not be as fiery as its predecessor but it’s just as- if not more- immediately gripping. Easily the band’s most atmospheric moment to date, “Black Ties & Diamonds” is as fire-and-brimstone as it is smoky haze, a classically noir-ish retreat down a murky riverbank. It’s an entirely new look for Mutts and one that suits them so naturally that it’s easy to forget their standard mode is blistering blues-infused noise-punk. As always, Maimone’s lyrics and keyboard work are just as sharp as Mutts’ rhythm section (which is made up of drummer Chris Pagnani and bassist Bob Buckstaff, respectively)- adding to their easily posited claim as one of the tightest units in the upper Midwest.

In lyric copy, “Black Ties & Diamonds” becomes a total deconstruction of a myriad of events, eventually revealing itself as a collection of vignettes that illustrate the trials of life’s overwhelmingly mundane nature. There’s a melancholic nature permeating throughout the track, accentuated by organ stabs, mood-heavy drumming, and frighteningly intuitive bass work. Musically, this veers far closer to the realms of Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds than the usually inevitable Tom Waits comparison the band’s so frequently earned in the past. It’s a complete anomaly in the band’s catalog; a minor headphones track in a sea of turned-to-11 explosives.

Production-wise, “Black Ties & Diamonds is the best Mutts have ever sounded electric- something that holds true for the rest of Fuel Yer Delusion vol. 4. This is a record that’s layered, sequenced, and mastered to perfection, with “Black Ties & Diamonds” standing out as the definitive track. Mutts aren’t done experimenting, moving forward, challenging themselves, or progressing. Not by a damn sight. “Black Ties & Diamonds” cements this as inexorable proof in stunning fashion, playing directly into the commendable ethics of one of America’s hardest-working bands. Don’t be too surprised to see their name starting to fight its way into regular conversation- and don’t make the mistake of ignoring something as subtly haunting as “Black Ties & Diamonds”.

Mutts will be throwing an LP release party for Fuel Yer Delusion vol. 4 which will be presented by Gapers Block and feature additional performances from Archie Powell & the ExportsThe Kickback, and Pop Goes The Evil. This will take place on December 6 at The Metro. 8 pm. $12 at the door and $8 in advance. Don’t make the mistake of missing this one.

Stream “Black Ties & Diamonds” below and make sure to pick up Fuel Yer Delusion vol. 4 as soon as possible.

The Sleepwalkers – Come Around (Music Video Premiere)

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There are very few records that have required as much patience as The Sleepwalkers’ just-released Lost My Mind in Stereo. That’s not to say it required a vast amount of dedication to appreciate; it just took a very long time to get released and was difficult not to share with just about everyone. Other than the USA Today premere of the extraordinary lead-off track “My Best Was Never Good Enough“, these songs have only existed in the world as a small handful of rough demos and live staples of Sleepwalkers’ sets. Now, the record’s finally out and the band’s granted this site the music video premiere for standout cut “Come Around”.

Lost My Mind in Stereo is a record full of songs that feel instantly classic, sharp blasts of music that are finely-tuned examples of both great songwriting and American culture. “Come Around” is one of the many examples where all of that is readily apparent. Incorporating everything from 60’s jangle to 90’s powerpop, there are no false notes. In the video, the band plays through the song in Oshkosh, WI venue Reptile Palace and intercuts footage of decidedly freewheeling shenanigans in the Fox Valley area, mostly involving food (Bron Sage’s Kyle Merckx also makes a few brief but memorable appearances). By the time “Come Around” fades into black and flashes a subliminal “WOOF”, it’s hard not to feel like a part of The Sleepwalkers’ world. It’s another instance of the band finding the exact pulse of a very particular timelessness and running with it. We’re all the better for it.

Watch “Come Around” below and make every day feel like the 4th of July.

Burger to Release Night Drives Debut

Night Drives cover art

Has any label done as much this year as Burger Records? At this point, it’s sincerely doubtful. As a testament to their restlessness, the fact that there are only two weeks left in the year has done absolutely nothing to slow them down. They’re also not ones to dabble in the politics of AotY lists and, as such, the quality of their most recent projects hasn’t been detrimental to their normal standard.

Burger has recently announced that they will be releasing the debut tapes from The Bam Bams and Night Drives. While the former is a worthwhile entry into their catalog, the latter is an absolute monster reminiscent of Thomas Function’s best work. Night Drives’ debut packs enough hooks, originality, and quality songwriting into the 11 songs on their debut that a lot of people might be upset they published their year-end lists as early as they did. It’s another must-purchase from a label that has a seemingly endless wellspring of them.

There’s no word on an official physical release for either yet but both The Bam Bams and Night Drives debuts are available for streaming in full over at Burger’s bandcamp (also referred to as their Dig It All site). Night Drives’ incredible self-titled effort can also be streamed below.

Watch This: Vol. 4

As the year winds down it can be fun to look back. Especially for places like this that only came into existence recently and didn’t have the chance to share some noteworthy items due to their time-sensitive nature. That’s to say; today’s Watch This is going to differ a little from the first three. This round will be focused on and dedicated to some really impressive solo performances that happened in 2013. From Katie Crutchfield to Amos Pitsch, this Sunday round-up features some of this site’s favorite songwriting talents. Take some time out this Sunday to relax and review some of the year’s best moments.

1. Waxahatchee (NPR Tiny Desk Session)

There haven’t been very many things in recent memory that have been satisfying to watch progress as the ascension of the Crutchfield’s. Arguably, it was Katie’s Waxahatchee project that gave them their biggest early push towards their current notoriety. This session, courtesy of NPR, feels a little bit like validation. Then again, it’s hard to feel anything that doesn’t directly correlate with what Katie pours into these songs. One of the most arresting songwriters of our generation.


2. Tenement – Hard to Say (Live at Nicey’s)

How Heartbreaking Bravery feels about this band is no secret (seriously, best band in existence, 2014 can’t get hear fast enough) so anytime something like this happens it’s worth featuring. The “this” in question being a solo set from frontman Amos Pitsch, an endlessly gifted and absurdly talented songwriter/all-around musician.  This video finds Pitsch playing this Blind Wink standout at an after-show that, incidentally, also featured Waxahatchee. Both artists deserve all the acclaim that’s sure to follow them.


3. Mikal Cronin – Don’t Let Me Go (Off the Record Session)

Mikal Cronin’s MCII absolutely dominated this summer- and for good reason. Nearly every track on his recent masterpiece evoked very specific feelings that felt most appropriate in a summer setting. One of MCII‘s most stunning moments was also one of the collection’s most vulnerable; the bare-bones “Don’t Let Me Go.” Here, given a live hue, the song becomes an even more personal (and gorgeous) paean to quietly determined resolve.


4. Noun – Misery (Live at Golden Tea House)

Screaming Females have been riding a wave of deserved success following last year’s astonishing Ugly, which would account for much of why Paternoster’s solo project has been a little more quiet than usual. While Noun certainly has been a less productive cabinet for Paternoster recently, it’s something deserving of just as much attention as her main vehicle. No new material has been released since Noun’s inspired Holy Hell LP, apart from a very limited reissue of the massive Forgotten Grin tape. Luckily for everyone, Don Giovanni Records was on hand to film a Noun set last month and footage surfaced yesterday of a new song called “Misery”, providing room for hope that Noun’s not quite done yet.


5. Cloud Nothings – Psychic Trauma (They Shoot Music)

There are very few 2014 LP’s that will be more heavily anticipated than Cloud Nothings’ purportedly noisier, weirder, and more atonal follow-up to their 2011 best-of-decade contender Attack On Memory. Dylan Baldi & co. haven’t allowed much insight to this new record, apart from a few surprise showings at festivals and a mysterious teaser. Oh, there was also the time Baldi showed up to deliver an extraordinarily promising solo acoustic performance of the record’s likely lead-off single, tentatively titled “Pyschic Trauma”. Between this and the two upcoming Tenement collections alone, 2014 should be one hell of a year for music.


Saintseneca – Visions (Music Video)

One of the very first bands that this site covered was All Dogs, who have a member that also does time in Saintseneca. In 2014 Saintseneca will be releasing a record via Anti-, who the band recently signed with. Their lead-up campaign to the April release of this record has a lot of people salivating in anticipation. Their most recent entry in this campaign is a music video for “Visions”, a previously released song that also acted as a B-side to their “Uppercutter” 7″.

In the new clip, courtesy of the Zenga’s, the song’s set to a stunning home movie compilation that’s somewhat reminiscent of the recent nostalgic pangs Okkervil River’s been using as a focal point. “Visions”, despite its humble aesthetics, does offer some genuinely stunning imagery that somehow manages to fairly balance implicit and explicit thematics. Light, violence, and escape are all involved. While the pace is set at a dizzying clip, the music manages to both ground and heighten the visuals.

“Visions” acts as a welcome reminder, an improbable showcase for both the band and the directing team, and somehow manages to be more memorable than it has any right to be. Saintseneca’s clearly a band on the rise and, from the decisions they’ve been making lately (as well as Anti-‘s interest), it would be stunning if they weren’t coming up in year-end discussions and lists at this time next year.

Watch the video over at Stereogum, who premiered it.

Globelamp – Star Dust (EP Review)

As the end of the year approaches, it can be easy for late releases (especially smaller ones) to get lost in the shuffle of best-of coverage. Year after year, writers draw up articles including phrases like “which surely would have made best-of list last year, had i caught it in time”. It’s a misfortune that claims several victims, some of which are the most inexplicably fascinating releases of the year. Globelamp’s Star Dust will likely fall into this category. Recorded onto an 8 track cassette recorder, it’s woozy psychedelic-tinged folk that has improbable pull.

Star Dust comes courtesy of the recording and producing duo that makes up Globelamp; Sam France and Elizabeth le Fey. Together the two operate in the realms that fringe on, and occasionally intrude, freak-folk. There’s a mirage of genres and influences that permeate through Star Dust, lending it a sense of deep intrigue that welcomes repeat visits. “Breathing Ritual” gets the EP off to a start as strong as anyone could hope for, acting as a song that both accurately represents the band and sets the tone for what’s to come.

While the trio of tracks that follow “Breathing Ritual” don’t hit the same heights, that’s no fault of their own. All three are strong in their own right and have a few moments approaching twisted brilliance- Globelamp do wonders with their tangential elements. Each track on Star Dust comes loaded with atmosphere, ensuring that close attention is paid to it throughout. None of the songs go over five minutes and all three following EP standout “Breathing Ritual” are acoustic-driven.

“Time Warp”, the most plaintive track on Star Dust, slows the EP’s momentum but has enough surprises dialed into it to keep listeners rapt. It’s also one of the tracks that places a greater emphasis on the vocals, which plays into one of the band’s strengths; le Fey’s charismatic personality and entrancing voice. “Constant is the Calling” closes out Star Dust in quiet fashion, offering glimpses at what makes this release so curious- and so appealing. When all’s said and done, what’s left is one of the year’s most unexpected and strangely beautiful releases.

Star Dust is available as a name-your-price release at bandcamp and is available for streaming below.

Vaadat Charigim – Kezef Al Hamayim (Music Video)

The World Is Well Lost has become a record impossible to shake; its implications run deeper than anticipated. Essentially a commentary on a variety of social issues currently facing Vaadat Charigim’s native Tel Aviv, the meanings behind the songs have faced major obstacles in breaking through a language barrier. However, the music on its own has remained impossibly affecting. Everything on The World Is Well Lost adds up to an incredible cohesive piece of art; the sum sometimes seeming far greater than its parts. That’s not to say those parts are unimpressive, a few of the songs taken as individuals are year-end candidates. One of them, “Kezef Al Hamayim”, now has a music video to accompany it.

“Kezef Al Hamayim” follows “Odisea” and comes about a month in advance of The World Is Well Lost‘s impending vinyl release. Vaadat Charigim sticks with the hazy glow they incorporated into the video for “Odisea”, only this time they turn the cameras on themselves. “Kezef Al Hamayim” is essentially nothing more than the band playing inside of a house but the way it’s lensed adds a sense of deep unease that plays into the song well. There’s little light to be found and the attention’s placed as much on the band as the song, which is a stunner. There are moments scattered across The World Is Well Lost that manage a stunning combination of post-punk, shoegaze, and powerpop. “Kezef Al Hamayim” is certainly one of them.

While the release may not be picking up the attention it deserves, despite the best efforts of both Burger Records and the band themselves, there’s no reason that can’t change. It hopefully will after the record receives a January vinyl release, because this is one of 2013’s best moments. Boundaries and barriers become less important when music operates on the level it does on The World Is Well Lost. The fact that a lot of people haven’t picked up on this band yet makes the record’s title frighteningly apt. Those that have (like FILTER, who premiered the video), won’t cease in their coverage until people have this band in their life. They’re that good.

The World Is Well Lost is available on cassette from Burger and the video for “Kezef Al Hamayim” is below.



Popstrangers – Rats in the Palm Trees (Music Video)

Popstrangers’ Antipodes was the first record since Technicolor Teeth’s Teenage Pagans to perfectly blend shoegaze with aggressive post-punk. Antipodes was also one of the first truly great records of 2013, strongly recalling labelmates Cloud Nothings’ Attack On Memory in tone, scope, and production. With a breakthrough record on their plate, it would’ve been understandable for the band to settle down and continue to play up the record for all its intrinsic worth. Instead, the band’s opting for the hyper-production route and has now revealed both an A and B side for a non-album single.

“Fortuna” was a serviceable B-side that showcased the band’s dream-punk underpinnings.  The A-side, “Rats in the Palm Trees” is a different beast entirely. On “Rats” the band settles back into their deepest strength; melody. “Rats in the Palm Trees” boasts a catchy chorus, several memorable moments of guitar work, some controlled frenetic drumming, and a driving bass line. It’s one of their best and suggests a long future. To accompany the song’s aesthetic the band released a music video earlier this week. In the clip, the band mostly incorporates low-grade footage of themselves playing their instruments and exploring London, where they recently relocated to.

Moving looks to be a smart move for the band as their tendencies and London’s play very well into each other. There’s a certain sense of minor foreboding, small-scale industrialism, and an endless amount of opportunity. It’s easy to see them finding comfort in their new home, the video already seems to suggest they’re in the midst of a contented transition. Watch it all below.