Heartbreaking Bravery

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Tag: Chow Chow

Faye – Faye (EP Review)

faye

Over the past few days, the site’s main focus has been getting back up to speed on the year’s most current releases. To that end, this post (and each of the four posts that will shortly follow) will include a quartet of notable releases from the past few days. This time around, those releases are full streams that came from the following artists: Bird of Youth, Braids, Mutual Benefit, and a split EP with two great sides from Naps and Yikes. It’s Faye, once again, who claim the featured spot.

The trio’s gearing up to release their debut EP and their early offerings have already managed to make a very serious mark. Faye‘s closing two tracks, “Chow Chow” and “Ancient Bones” have already been praised on this site. Those two tracks constitute an extraordinary finale that set very high expectations for the rest of the EP. Fortunately, the opening trio of tracks lives up to the exceptional promise that “Chow Chow” and “Ancient Bones” all but flaunted.

“Yellow Canary” kick things off with a spiky, hook-laden mid-tempo run through some grunge-leaning post-punk. “Teacups” and “Vowels” follow suit, with each establishing their own set of very distinct characteristics. For as specific as Faye’s tastes run, it would’ve been easy for the band to fall into the trap of repetition. Instead, each track on Faye registers as a standout by virtue of being so clearly defined in their separation. It’s a remarkably nuanced and startlingly mature piece of work from a young band. Expect very big things for their future (and play Faye as loud as possible).

Listen to Faye below and pre-order the tape from Tiny Engines here.

Faye – Ancient Bones (Stream)

faye

Editor’s Note: There’s been a month-long gap in coverage, thanks to near-incessant travel and other extenuating circumstances. The following run of posts that contain this note will be posts that should have appeared sometime within the past several weeks. Use these posts as an opportunity to catch up to the present release cycle or to simply discover some new music. Either way, enjoy.

One of 2016’s most intriguing emerging acts made their mark with the memorable post-punk cut “Chow Chow“. That band, of course, was Faye, who have once again surfaced to offer up the haunting, meditative “Ancient Bones”. This time around, the band switches their focus from immediacy and directness to a more slow-burning, dynamic approach that pays dividends in unexpected ways. “Ancient Bones” is among the most gripping songs of the year’s post-punk output but it never sacrifices the amount of heart that propelled “Chow Chow” into a feature spot only a month ago.

The decision to embrace restraint and let the song slowly unfurl winds up benefiting the band’s intelligent melodic sensibilities while displaying an air of maturity that suggests they’re far more than a carefree party band. “Ancient Bones” also turns darkly introspective in its chorus, focusing in on a fractured relationship with a laser-like intensity that brings up the possibility the band may eventually be responsible for some of the strongest lyrical narratives of DIY punk’s slew of noteworthy emergent acts.

It’s a deeply promising song that demonstrates a tremendous amount of potential, that the trio’s capitalized on as much of it as they have already is nothing short of astounding and “Ancient Bones” serves as remarkably compelling proof.

Listen to “Ancient Bones” below and pre-order Faye here.

Faye – Chow Chow (Stream)

faye

April’s been a very strong month for new song releases in its early goings, this much has been evidenced by great new cuts from Supermoon, And the Kids, Mutual Benefit, Phooey!, Attic Abasement, Traitrs, Seratones, The Lees of Memory, and Leggy. All of those songs have managed to find a whole host of pleasure points and deserve the array of admiration that should be directed their way. Another song worthy of praise is the one that this post was constructed to feature: Faye’s brooding post-punk dirge “Chow Chow”.

A sludgy bass line and a dissonant guitar part kick things off before the song blooms into a punchy pop-skewing number lamenting the lack of anything noticeably unique in daily, run-of-the-mill livelihood. Towards the end of the chorus section, “Chow Chow” betrays Faye’s desire for adventure and their refusal to accept status quos, a common admirable trait in emerging bands worth their salt. Over the course of a scant two minutes (and some change), Faye make their mark and take a shot at genuine longevity. “Chow Chow” ensure their place as a band to watch.

Listen to “Chow Chow” below and pre-order Faye here.