Heartbreaking Bravery

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Tag: Arcade Fire

Basement Revolver – Baby (Stream)

Over the span of last week songs by Sarah Mary Chadwick, The Bae Beach Club, Dan Rico, God Bless Relatives, Dear Nora, Jackson Reed, Gillian Frances, Nation of Language, Dear Japan, Ness Lake, Henrik Appel, and a Weaves cover of an Arcade Fire classic all managed to make an impression. Each one of those tracks constitutes a distinct highlight for the band listed. The very same can be said for Basement Revolver‘s latest, “Baby”, which is their finest moment to date.

Despite releasing some of the more memorable songs of the past few years, Basement Revolver have never released a full-length. They’ve got two impressive EP’s and an extraordinary Audiotree session under their belt but the full album format they’ve let linger as a tantalizing promise. “Baby” is the first look at their debut album and it’s an absolutely stunning slow-burner that envelops the listener in an avalanche of tenderness and volume.

From the jump, “Baby” makes no bones about aiming for bombast but it’s the build-up to its finale and the way it swells far past being merely bombastic on its way to achieving a cathartic euphoria that makes the song stand out. The band’s honed and refined their craft for years, each one bringing them wider success and a more visible platform. If “Baby” is any indication, Basement Revolver’s not just prepared for the next big step but fully capable of decimating the expectations it may bring.

Easily one of the most gorgeous rock songs of 2018, “Baby” yearns for the kind of understanding that makes life more comforting while reaching skyward, hoping to pluck even a modicum of reassurance out of the air. The music emphasizes the words and vice versa, with both the composition and narrative displaying a mesmerizing brand of vulnerability. It’s an absolutely incredible track and heralds the arrival of Basement Revolver’s next era. With any luck, a whole army of new listeners will be along for the ride.

Listen to “Baby” below and pre-order Heavy Eyes here.

Will Butler – Anything You Want / 4 July 17 (Stream)

Continuing onward with the individual features for some of the most outstanding individual achievements over the past seven weeks, the focus falls to an oddity of a track from Arcade Fire’s Will Butler: “Anything You Want / 4 July 17”.

There couldn’t have been a lot of people could have anticipated that Will Butler would wind up being the most formidable lyricist housed in Arcade Fire or that he’d be making the most interesting music of anyone in the band at this point in their careers but “Anything You Want / 4 July 17” all but cements both of those statements. Arcade Fire are currently in the midst of the harshest reviews of their career for their just-released Everything Now while Butler’s still enjoying a rising profile thanks to some small critical acclaim and recognition for his excellent 2015 solo effort, Policy.

All of the songs on Policy seemed to suggest untapped depths of the younger Butler’s musical talents but “Anything You Want / 4 July 17” obliterates what was the perceived ceiling on the multi-instrumentalist’s lyricism. Few songs from revered songwriters and lyricists have matched the kind of narrative web and mastery of tone that Butler displays here in a song that was released as a standalone curiosity just before the 4th of July.

Not only does “Anything You Want / 4 July 17” skewer and then humanize American politics with a near-unmatched clarity of empathy, the song also blends in some sharp relief through black humor and unexpected intimacy. All the while, a gorgeous piano figure both heightens and propels the narrative, landing the song somewhere between the camps of Randy Newman and Harry Nilsson without ever being dwarfed by the shadow of either forebear.

Verse to verse, whether Butler’s wrangling tongue-in-cheek laughs or painful recognition, there’s not a false or forced moment throughout “Anything You Want / 4 July 17” even as an already extremely broad scope continues to expand throughout the song’s six minute run-time. By the time Butler scales things way back, the song’s touched on systemic dynamics from powerful institutions through an endearingly micro vantage point.

It’s an extraordinary achievement — especially for what appears to just be a random one-off song — and should skyrocket anticipation for whatever’s next for Butler’s solo career. If it can even remotely approach these heights, it’ll stand a shot at being one of the decade’s best releases. Until that moment comes, it’s hard to imagine anyone will resist paying “Anything You Want / 4 July 17” an endless onslaught of revisits. Don’t let this one go by unheard.

Listen to “Anything You Want / 4 July 17” below and keep an eye on this site for more updates on Will Butler.

Heartbreaking Bravery: A Retrospective Introduction

When Heartbreaking Bravery started, it was originally intended to be a place where film and music found equal footing. Now, 100 days and 100 posts later, it’s clear that somewhere along the line it established an identity firmly based on the music side of things. There are going to be a few changes made to the site in the upcoming year, one of them will be a section devoted to the discussion of film. New features will start and old features will be kept running. A few of the first updates were made earlier today. In addition to having its own domain, Heartbreaking Bravery now officially has homes on Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr. Look for extra content, to varying degrees, on all three platforms.

For those just joining in or becoming aware of Heartbreaking Bravery’s existence, there are two things to ease into the familiarization process. One’s a playlist that features the kind of music that’s most regularly featured, which can be found below. Below that, active hyperlinks for the first 99 articles. Happy listening.

There are 25 bands and songs in this playlist. A few have received coverage from Heartbreaking Bravery, another few should have, and a fair few were part of what inspired its very existence. All of these bands mean something to this place and hopefully they’ll mean just as much, if not more, to whoever comes across them.

HB001: Audacity – Hole in the Sky (Music Video)
HB002: Swearin’ – Surfing Strange (Album Review)
HB003: Albert Hammond Jr – Carnal Cruise (Music Video)
HB004: PUP – PUP (Album Review)
HB005: Perfect Pussy – I have lost all desire for feeling (EP Review)
HB006: All Dogs – 7″ (Review)
HB007: Radioactivity – Radioactivity (Album Review)
HB008: A Look at Burger Records and the Longevity of the Cassette Tape
HB009: La Luz Suffer Major Setbacks in Semi-truck Collision
HB010: Midwives – EP (Review)
HB011: Pkew Pkew Pkew (gunshots) – Glory Days (Music Video)
HB012: Midnight Reruns’ Debut LP Streaming on Punknews
HB013: Nobunny at the Frequency – 11/11/13 (Live Review)
HB014: Angel Olsen – Forgiven/Forgotten (Music Video)
HB015: Polvo – Light, Raking (Music Video)
HB016: Split Feet – Fall Demo 2013 (Review)
HB017: Big Eyes – The Sun Still Shines (Music Video)
HB018: INTERVIEW: Meredith Graves (Perfect Pussy)
HB019: Great Thunder – Groovy Kinda Love (Album Review)
HB020: Gap Dream – Shine Your Light (Music Video)
HB021: Arcade Fire – Afterlife (Music Video)
HB022: Vaadat Charigim – Odisea (Music Video)
HB023: On the Up: Acid Fast
HB024: Watch This: Vol. 1
HB025: Va°nna Inget – Inga fra°gor Inga svar (Music Video)
HB026: Benny the Jet Rodriguez – Run. (Music Video)
HB027: Rookie Streams the Beyond Inversion Comp
HB028: On the Up: Meat Wave
HB029: Popstrangers – Rats in the Palm Trees (Music Video)
HB030: Allison Weiss – Wait for Me (Music Video)
HB031: Watch This: Vol. 2
HB032: Beyond Inversion Available at Bandcamp
HB033: Burger Releases MCII on Cassette
HB034: Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds – Higgs Boson Blues (Music Video)
HB035: Vaadat Charigim – Kezef Al Hamayim (Music Video)
HB036: Angel Olsen – Forgiven/Forgotten (Official Music Video)
HB037: Globelamp – Star Dust (EP Review)
HB038: Watch This: Vol. 3
HB039: Saintseneca – Visions (Music Video)
HB040: Sunn O))) & Ulver Preview Collaborative LP
HB041: Burger Streams Velvet Underground Tribute Compilation
HB042: The Thermals Release Online Video Game
HB043: Tokyo Police Club – Argentina (Parts I, II, & III) (Music Video)
HB044: The Dead Weather Unleash Killer New Single
HB045: Majical Cloudz – Savage (Music Video)
HB046: On the Up: Nervosas
HB047: Watch This: Vol. 4
HB048: Burger to Release Night Drives Debut
HB049: AV Club Premieres Acid Fast’s “Tangle”
HB050: Home for the Holidays & A Guide to Surviving (Mixtape)
HB051: Burger Streams Massive Holiday Mix
HB052: Come Back Soon
HB053: Vertical Scratchers – These Plains (Stream)
HB054: Watch This: Vol. 5
HB055: The Flaming Lips’ Christmas on Mars (Film Stream)
HB056: On the Up: Tenement
HB057: Happy Holidays (Video Playlist)
Hb058: Yuck – Somewhere (Music Video)
HB059: The Flaming Lips’ 1983 2nd Cassette Demo (Stream)
HB060: 2013: A Video Review
HB061: Watch This: Vol. 6
HB062: RIP: Benjamin Curtis (Secret Machines, School of Seven Bells)
HB063: Stephen Malkmus & the Jicks – Wig Out at Jagbag’s (Stream)
HB064: 2013: A Photography Review
HB065: The Hussy – EZ/PZ (Stream)
HB066: Fire Retarded – Meat Stairs (Stream)
HB067: Mutts and Buffalo Moon Release Music Videos, Get People Dancing
HB068: Watch This: Vol. 7
HB069: Cass McCombs – Big Wheel (Music Video)
HB070: On the Up: Technicolor Teeth
HB071: 25 Best Demo’s, EP’s, 7″ Singles, and Compilations of 2013
HB072: Mozes & the Firstborn – Skinny Girl (Music Video)
HB073: Protomartyr – Rise, Scum! (Stream)
HB074: Nothing – Guilty of Everything (Trailer)
HB075: Watch This: Vol. 8
HB076: Liars – Mess On A Mission (Stream)
HB077: Big Air – Cemetery With A View (Song Premiere)
HB078: Perfect Pussy – Driver (Stream)
HB079: Tweens – Be Mean (Stream)
HB080: Cloud Nothings Preview New Record in Brooklyn (Stream)
HB081: Golden Animals – Most My Time (Music Video)
HB082: Watch This: Vol. 9
HB083: Eagulls – Possessed (Stream)
HB084: Sneak Peek: Failures’ Union, Neighborhood Brats, Corrections (Streams)
HB085: Perfect Pussy at Schubas Tavern – 1/22/14 (Live Review)
HB086: DTCV – Alpha Waves in a Gelatinous Conductor (Music Video)
HB087: PILE – Special Snowflakes (Stream)
HB088: Watch This: Vol. 10
HB089: Cloud Nothings – I’m Not Part of Me (Stream)
HB090: Adam Widener – Laughter on Your Heels I’ll Follow (Music Video)
HB091: Potty Mouth – Black and Studs (Music Video)
HB092: Lemuria – Oahu, Hawaii (Music Video)
HB093: Screaming Females at Cactus Club – 1/29/14 (Live Review)
HB094: together PANGEA – Offer (Music Vide0)
HB095: The Trucks – Space Famous (Demo Review)
HB096: Watch This: Vol. 11
HB097: Saintseneca – Happy Alone (Music Video)
HB098: Vaadat Charigim – Ein Nehama Ladoachim (Music Video)
HB099: The Sleepwalkers – It’s A Good Day to Watch the World Go By (Stream)

Arcade Fire – Afterlife (Music Video)

When this site first started, it was intended as a place where both music and film were provided equal coverage. Nearly a month into operation now, it’s fairly clear that the musical side of the equation has, and is, going to receive the most emphasis. Since there tends to be less of a market for extremely notable film news, the best way to provide the format coverage thus far is by spotlighting music videos. On a separate note, Heartbreaking Bravery is nothing if not a place that provides emerging artists with a level playing field. All of this being said, there are certain moments that would be foolish to discount just because an artist’s already built an enormous fan base.

Being completely honest, this post is less inspired by Arcade Fire’s involvement and more by the participation of Emily Kai Bock. She’s essentially become this generation’s Anton Corbijn. Curiously, Corbijn directed the last Arcade Fire clip (discounting Spike Jonze’s Greta Gerwig-starring experiment at the YouTube Music Awards) and added a few unforeseen stylistic touches managed to cause a sizable stir with his work. As admirable as his “Reflektor” video was, it doesn’t hold a candle to the work of his successor.

Kai Bock opens up the video for “Afterlife” with an exercise in familial tension not too far removed from what James Murphy accomplished with his Canon Project Imagination short Little DuckWhat happens next is a masterclass in composition, structure, and how to infuse a small piece with a hefty amount of emotional resonance. Close to all of the clip’s strongest moments are of a more implicit nature, allowing the viewer to color in specific instances with devastatingly realistic cues. A vast majority of the spectrum of mortality and the desires that accompany the specific stages are covered by Kai Bock, who utilizes stark black and whites, industrial landscapes, and a few outstanding performances. Everything is capped off by an absolutely heartbreaking reunion that elevates this video to level of format mastery that should cement Kai Bock’s reputation as one of the best music video directors working today.

Reflektor may have been a problematic record but “Afterlife” was easily it’s strongest moment. Kai Bock has taken that moment to an even more impressive place. Watch the video below and clear some time to sit in stunned silence after. This is work worth remembering.