Heartbreaking Bravery

stevenmps2@gmail.com | @steven_mps | @hbreakbravery

Tag: Angelic Milk

A Week and a Half’s Worth of Material

Over the past week and a half there was a vast arsenal of material that found release across all three major formats. All of the titles that made a sizable impression will be linked to below and all of them are well worth exploring. Over the next few days there will be a laundry list of individual items to find small features but that in no way should deter from the immense value of the songs listed below. If there was enough time to provide each and every one of these entries features of their own, a regular day would have to be well over 24 hours. As it stands, the best approach is to simply bookmark this page and peruse these selections at a preferred pace. Keep an eye out for more updates from this site very soon and enjoy the incredible offerings that are available below.

Streams

The Raveonettes, Coaster, Puerto Rico Flowers, Beachtape, Sad13 (x2), Small Wonder, Two Houses, Floating Room, Hooton Tennis Club, Communions, Monster Rally, Mark Sultan, CRX, Dama Scout, Lady Lamb, Maria Taylor (ft. Conor Oberst), The Cinematic Orchestra (ft. Moses Sumney), Frank Weysos, Parlour Tricks, JD Werner, Del Water Gap, Invisible Boy, Magic Magic Roses, Hand Habits, The Breaks, Tyvek, clipping., Flower Girl, Mark Eitzel, Soft Lions, Cosmonauts, Desperate Journalist, Sonnyskyes, Tyler Daniel BeanSløtface, Cory Hanson, Sinai Vessel, Will Johnson, MOLLY, The Olympian, Boon, Emily Reo, Joanna Newsom, War Nurse, Ramonda Hammer, Sundayman, Yeasayer, Gummy, Sacred Paws, Enemies, BROS, Dead Leaf Echo, Mo Troper, Jarrod Milton, Dante Decaro, wrtch, Miya Folick, and Frankie Cosmos

Music Videos

Flasher, Honeyblood, Gland, Black Marble, Matt Kivel, Emilyn Brodsky, Peacock Affect, The Soonest, Alpenglow, Peder, Peeling, Worms, Girl Ray, Communist Daughter, Moonheart, The Superweaks, Sara Jackson-Holman, Andy Shauf, Monomyth, Victoria + Jean, The Avalanches, Purling Hiss, Tanukichan, Lou Barlow, Pity Sex, Froth, Allison Crutchfield, Strange Relations, Berwanger, Hazel English, Nada, Mayflower, Jess Williamson, Brunch, The Cavemen, Ray & Remora, Busman’s Holiday, Matt Costa, Muncie Girls, Soaker, and Oh Pep!.

Full Streams

Slothrust, Eric Schermerhorn, Tony Molina, Perfume-V, Silent, gobbinjr, Thick, Sam Kogon, Soft Pyramids, Max, Suntrodden, Loamlands, Nocturnal Habits, Choir Boy, Twiga, Angelic Milk, Realms, Parlour Tricks, Skye Wallace, Saba, Dead To Me, Teen Suicide, No Nets, Kevin Morby, Bloody Death Skull, Tournament, King Dude, Spectral Fangs, Communist DaughterSpeak Into My Good Eye‘s The 3rd Annual 24 Hour Songwriting Challenge, and Brown Acid, a joint-effort compilation from Riding Easy Records and Permanent Records that explores some of the heavier music of the ’60s and ’70s.

Izzy True – Total Body Erasure (Stream)

izzy-true

Following a small gap in coverage (mostly due to travel and preliminary work on upcoming projects), there’s a lot of material to cover. Roughly five dozen excellent new tracks emerged over that course of time and a third of them will be presented throughout the initial round of review coverage. This particular list constitutes the middle third and contains excellent new numbers from J&L Defer, Carl Sagan’s Skate Shoes, Mothers, Bellows, Yohuna, Manuela, Black Marble, June Gloom, Yea-Ming and the Rumours, Juliana Wilson, Angelic Milk, Ubetcha, Creative Adult, Golden Suits, King Creosote, Sharks’ Teeth, Ryan Hemsworth, Ryley Walker, and Lizard Kisses.

The featured track belongs to A Year’s Worth of Memories alum Isabel Reidy’s project, Izzy True. After a dazzling EP, the project’s readying their debut full-length, Nope. Leading off the rollout campaign is the record’s brilliant lead-off single “Total Body Erasure”. Tapping into the swamp-punk, roots, Americana, folk, blues, and dirtied up rock n’ roll influences that made the Troll EP one of last year’s most compelling listens, “Total Body Erasure” also achieves the impressive feat of heightening the level of lyricism attached to the band by tackling a subject that manages to feel both intimate and political without one aspect ever outweighing the other.

It’s an astonishing piece of songwriting that suggests Reidy’s quickly becoming one of this generation’s finest young lyricists. If the rest of Nope can live up to the level set by its introductory piece, Izzy True has a legitimate shot at being one of 2016’s most notable breakout successes. All that’s left is to wait, see, and hit repeat on “Total Body Erasure” until that moment, during that moment, and well past that moment. Whichever way it shakes out ultimately won’t matter. What does matter is the strength of Reidy, Troll, and “Total Body Erasure”, which is more than enough to prove that we should all keep listening.

Listen to “Total Body Erasure” below and keep an eye on Don Giovanni for the pre-orders of Nope. 

Dentist – Joel (Stream)

dentist

Monday tends to be one of the more eclectic release days for standalone streams and today proved to be no different. Worthwhile material emerged from just about every genre this site typically covers and continued to stretch some boundaries. The following artists all had songs that deserved to be heard: Consilience, Jackal Onasis, Gap Dream, Sweat, Scarlett Saunders, Cheena, Possible Humans, Ranch Ghost, Above Top Secret, and The Meltaways. In addition to those releases, a small handful of notable music videos from angelic milk, Wireheads, Haley Bonar, Preoccupations, and Ali Beleitc also saw the light of day.

Dentist’s surf-tinged “Joel” wound up securing the feature spot by virtue of sheer strength. Opening up on a foreboding riff and staccato chord stabs awash in reverb, “Joel” sets an intriguing — and oddly compelling —  tone at its onset. Slowly, the guitar fades and gives way to a creeping piano figure that injects the song with an eerie Southern Gothic sensibility. Then, after a brief rest, the song snaps into a sugary overdrive that kicks the energy up from 15 to 80 in an instant.

Following the switch, Dentist falls comfortably into a groove that operates as a pastiche of pop influences from decades long gone. It’s a perfect transition that illustrates the band’s understanding of their craft, suggesting that Dentist’s forthcoming Ceilings may be one of 2016’s most unexpected joys. Apart from the invigorating dynamic shifts of “Joel”, the song’s vibrant second act endearingly instills the song with a surplus of giddy joy. “Joel” ultimately goes from bleakly intimidating to openly welcoming, leaving one hell of an imprint in the process.

It’s another entry in an already-long string of unlikely summer anthem candidates, carefree and just about perfect.

Listen to “Joel” below and pre-order Ceilings from Little Dickman here.


[Editor’s Note: The beginning of coverage in 2016 was an extremely hectic time and one odd quirk of this site was overlooked. That particular oversight will be amended in this post, which precedes the resumption of posting the 100 immediately preceding entries in the continuously-expanding Heartbreaking Bravery catalog of posts. A few of the image links are broken and some of the galleries are missing but all of them will eventually make the migration to Heartbreaking Bravery’s flickr. Keep an eye out.]

To access posts 700-799, click on the links listed below.

HB700: Wrap Up Warm (Mixtape)
HB701: Ronnie Stone & The Lonely Riders – ❤ Race. Cold Sweat. Nu Dance. Do It. (Glassio Remix Premiere)
HB702: Phooey! – Molly’s at the Laundromat (Song Premiere)
HB703: Idle Bloom – Pride Line (Stream, Live Video)
HB704: METZ – Spit You Out (Music Video)
HB705: Alex G – Brite Boy (Music Video)
HB706: Dilly Dally – The Touch (Music Video)
HB707: Dusk – Too Sweet (Music Video)
HB708: Watch This: Vol. 108
HB709: Watch This: Vol. 109
HB710: Watch This: Vol. 110
HB711: Patio – Patio Songs (Demo Review, Stream, Live Video)
HB712: PURPLE 7 – Garden Eyes (Album Review, Stream)
HB713: Milk Crimes – Milk Crimes (EP Review, Stream)
HB714: Bad Wig – Bad Wig (EP Review, Stream, Live Video)
HB715: Beliefs – Colour of Your Name (Stream)
HB716: Bruising – Honey (Stream)
HB717: Lucy Dacus – I Don’t Wanna Be Funny Anymore (Stream)
HB718: Mothers – Too Small For Eyes (Stream)
HB719: Birth (Defects) – Ascetic (Stream)
HB720: Casket Girls – Deep Time (Stream)
HB721: Two Inch Astronaut – Good Behavior (Stream)
HB722: bed. – The Rule (Stream)
HB723: Dark Blue – Delco Runts (Stream)
HB724: A Short Review (Live Video Compilation
HB725: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. I
HB726: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. II
HB727: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. III
HB728: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. IV
HB729: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. V
HB730: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. VI
HB731: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. VII
HB732: 2015: The Best of Watch This
HB733: 15 of ’15: The Best EP’s of 2015
HB734: 15 of ’15: The Best Music Videos of 2015
HB735: 15 of ’15: The Best Odds and Ends of 2015
HB736: 15 of ’15: The Best Songs of 2015
HB737: 15 of ’15: The Best Albums of 2015
HB738: The Honorable Mentions of the 2015 Music Categories
HB739: The Best Scenes of 2015
HB740: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Loren DiBlasi)
HB741: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Lindsey-Paige McCloy)
HB742: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Sabyn Mayfield)
HB743: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Nicola Leel)
HB744: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Lindsay Hazen)
HB745: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Tica Douglas)
HB746: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Fred Thomas)
HB747: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Phil McAndrew)
HB748: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Isabel Reidy)
HB749: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jessica Leach)
HB750: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Sami Martasian)
HB751: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Ben Grigg)
HB752: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Amanda Dissinger)
HB753: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Bella Mazzetti)
HB754: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (David Anthony)
HB755: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jamie Coletta)
HB756: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Chris Sutter)
HB757: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (John Rossiter)
HB758: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Cole Kinsler)
HB759: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Megan Manowitz)
HB760: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Gabriela June Tully Claymore)
HB761: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Stephen Tringali)
HB762: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Alisa Rodriguez)
HB763: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Toby Reif)
HB764: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (100%)
HB765: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Amelia Pitcherella)
HB766: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Katie Bennett)
HB767: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Miranda Fisher)
HB768: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Christine Varriale)
HB769: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Sam Clark)
HB770: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Julia Leiby)
HB771: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Kelly Johnson)
HB772: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jessi Frick)
HB773: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Nicholas Cummins)
HB774: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Lily Mastrodimos)
HB775: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jerard Fagerberg)
HB776: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Athylia Paremski)
HB777: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Eric Slick)
HB778: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (David Glickman)
HB779: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Ryan Wizniak)
HB780: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories
HB781: WASHA – Bury Our Love (Music Video Premiere)
HB782: 2016: The First Two Months (Streams)
HB783: 2016: The First Two Months (Full Streams)
HB784: 2016: The First Two Months (Music Videos)
HB785: Introducing: Ubetcha
HB786: Inside Voices – Nomad:Begin (Song Premiere)
HB787: Watch This: The Honorable Mentions of 2016’s First Quarter
HB788: Horse Teeth – Dark & Gloomy (Song Premiere)
HB789: March 2016: The Full Streams
HB790: March 2016: The Music Videos
HB791: March 2016: The Streams
HB792: Ladada – Hi Five (EP Premiere)
HB793: The 50 Best Songs of 2016’s First Quarter
HB794: The Nudes – Nowhere To Be (Song Premiere)
HB795: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. I
HB796: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. II
HB797: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. III
HB798: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. IV
HB799: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. V

Told Slant – High Dirge (Stream)

felix

Today unearthed great songs from angelic milk, Heaven For Real, Mourn, Lion’s Den, TSP, Kwesi Foraes, notable videos from The Virginmarys (who almost earned this post’s feature spot by virtue of their clip’s sheer honesty), Whitney, Ty Segall, Mothers, Oh Pep!, and a genuine Album of the Year candidate in Attic Abasement‘s Dream News. It also brought Told Slant‘s breathtaking “High Dirge” out into the world.

After gifting the world with the chill-inducing “Low Hymnal” — still a very strong candidate for 2016’s best song — and the warm “Tsunami”, the Felix Walworth-led project has returned to provided another glimpse at their forthcoming Going By. Of the two songs that have been released, “High Dirge” falls more in line with the somber nature of “Low Hymnal” than the more celebratory sensibilities of “Tsunami”, embracing an otherworldly melancholy that goes a long way in making the song feel endearingly human.

From the startlingly realized scene that opens the track, “High Dirge” never once veers away from the small, every day moments that confirm we’re alive. Whether it’s freshening up in the bathroom or prying yourself open, there’s enough time for a host of questions to emerge. Some of them get tackled, some get ignored, pushed to the wayside out of either fear or despondence.

Walworth addresses, confronts, and reassures those moments with the simple refrain of “It’s a long life, it’s hard to get it right” towards the song’s close, a surprisingly hopeful upgrade from “It’s a long life, I can’t get it right.” “High Dirge” is the third song from Going By to thrive on Walworth’s naked openness, bravely laying everything bare for a clinical dissection that’s as unforgiving as it is insightful.

Yet, the song never nears a feeling of total loss or hopelessness, offering just enough positivity to keep “High Dirge” courageously stretching forward towards something better. While there’s an inherent heartbreak to that glimmer of hope, that same lightness also allows the song to stay grounded and painfully relatable. As usual, the stakes of the narrative are heightened by incredibly tasteful and deeply intuitive instrumental work (the banjo figures of Going By have been nothing short of perfect) that provides “High Dirge” with an impressive dramatic flair.

Ultimately, “High Dirge” feels representative for Told Slant’s current era and marks a high point for Walworth’s songwriting, which may very well be why it also claims the line that gives Going By its title: High dirge for the way that I am going by. That line arrives in the song’s gentle outro section, which underlines the steady uncertainty that serves as the crux of “High Dirge”.

It’s a beautiful tactic that strengthens one of the song’s most important unifying threads before everything fades into silence. One last moment of transcendence in a song that’s destined to be remembered.

Listen to “High Dirge” below and pre-order Going By from Double Double Whammy here.

Fraser A. Gorman – Shiny Gun (Music Video)

Fraser-A-Gorman-promo

After two consecutive clips dealing with extremely heavy subject matter, switching focus to much lighter fare almost seems necessary. Before getting into the carefree fun-fest that is Fraser A. Gorman’s latest clip for “Shiny Gun”, there will be one last video round-up to get the coverage of the format caught back up to the present release cycle. Heartless Bastards unveiled their confrontational “Gates of Dawn“, Angelic Milk went the irreverent effects route for “IDK How“, Fred Thomas indulged in some light masochism for “Cops Don’t Care, Pt. II“, Leon Bridges furthered his throwback aesthetic with “Better Man“, Elisa Ambrogio tapped into a deeply moving wistfulness through “Arkansas“, Vince Staples flexed some serious artistic muscle with the arresting “Señorita“, and Glockabelle’s immensely lovable 8-bit lunacy intensified with “Wolf BBQ“. All seven clips deserve a few run-throughs and quite a bit of attention. Of course, so does Fraser A. Gorman’s “Shiny Gun”, which is why it wound up as this post’s headline selection.

After some humorous text-only exposition- over some tongue-in-cheek broadcast music- about news anchors getting fired for unprofessional behavior (and then starting a band), “Shiny Gun” takes us back to that final, fateful day in the studio. What follows is an absurd collection of non-responses after a bevvy of failed studio re-direct attempts, with a cast of misfit anchors (including site favorite Courtney Barnett) doing an abysmal job at their actual job, completely ignoring everything and looking miserable in the process. That sense of downtrodden misery carries throughout the black-and-white broadcast, that is, until someone shows up with some guitars. After the first hand-off results in a twangy solo (cue Gorman’s enthused “Deep!”), the whole thing switches back over to technicolor as the studio side anchors get to shed their shackles cut loose as Gorman’s “Shiny Gun” (which is the closest thing I’ve heard to someone accurately emulating The Band in ages) takes them home. It’s one of the more joyous, deadpan clips to emerge from this year and it certainly bodes well for Gorman’s upcoming Slow Gum (which is being released on Courtney Barnett’s own Milk! Records label), which is sounding more promising by the minute. If you were looking for something enjoyably simplistic and carefree to unwind with tonight, you’ve just struck gold.

Watch “Shiny Gun” below and pre-order Slow Gum, which will be available via Milk! in Australia, House Anxiety/Marathon Artists in the UK,  here.

White Reaper – I Don’t Think She Cares (Stream)

wr

It’s been a while since regular coverage of new releases cropped up on this site (part of which was due to other obligations), which is why the majority of tonight will feature an influx of posts touching on some of the pieces of art that made the past week so great. For this post and the majority of the posts that will be following this entry, the focus will remain on songs. All of them are songs worth adding to your collection and the first of which, Jason Isbell’s breathtaking “24 Frames“, boasts a lyric set so tremendous that it’s difficult not to expect his forthcoming record will be a critical darling. Dignan Porch’s “Out of the Picture” continued Art Is Hard’s white-hot winning streak, Sam Evian’s “Cherry Tree” further illustrated the respective individual talents that Celestial Shore‘s been producing, Angelic Milk put the listening world on notice with the razor-sharp shard of basement pop in “IDK How“, and A$AP Rocky furthered his case to be considered one of rap’s most compelling acts with an unlikely collaboration that features Rod Stewart, Miguel, and Mark Ronson (the endlessly smooth “Everyday“). Public Access T.V.’s tantalizingly light “All We Want“, Envy’s sprawling “Footsteps in the Distance“, Dikembe’s slow-burning “Surfed in the Loft“, and Magic Potion’s endearing basement pop tune “Booored” round off the first featured set. As always, I wish I could devote more than just a few words to each title but there simply isn’t enough time to cover everything in more exhaustive detail. At this point in time, the system in which the headline is determined is nearing a lottery system- and White Reaper beat the odds this time out.

Make Me Wanna Die” had already made a sizable impression and stoked the fires of anticipation for White Reaper’s upcoming full-length; “I Don’t Think She Cares” ensures that trajectory continues its ascension. “I Don’t Think She Cares” is another furious burst of basement punk with strong pop sensibilities coated in layers of fuzz, providing the song an even stronger punch. Incendiary riffing, absurdly melodic synth lines, and a vocal take so impassioned you can practically feel Tony Esposito violently shaking, it’s another perfect representation of the band’s supercharged aesthetic. Clocking in at a precise two minutes, it makes the most out of every single second, expanding the song into something surprisingly dynamic for such an abbreviated running time. Decades worth of punk cornerstones, past and present, collide in an exhilarating, celebratory whirlwind. Now two songs into their rollout campaign, White Reaper Does It Again is shaping up to be a potential career-maker for the emerging upstarts. All that’s left is to see if the main course can live up to the appetizers.

Listen to “I Don’t Think She Cares” below and pre-order White Reaper Does It Again from Polyvinyl.