Heartbreaking Bravery

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Tag: Ali Beletic

Dentist – Joel (Stream)

dentist

Monday tends to be one of the more eclectic release days for standalone streams and today proved to be no different. Worthwhile material emerged from just about every genre this site typically covers and continued to stretch some boundaries. The following artists all had songs that deserved to be heard: Consilience, Jackal Onasis, Gap Dream, Sweat, Scarlett Saunders, Cheena, Possible Humans, Ranch Ghost, Above Top Secret, and The Meltaways. In addition to those releases, a small handful of notable music videos from angelic milk, Wireheads, Haley Bonar, Preoccupations, and Ali Beleitc also saw the light of day.

Dentist’s surf-tinged “Joel” wound up securing the feature spot by virtue of sheer strength. Opening up on a foreboding riff and staccato chord stabs awash in reverb, “Joel” sets an intriguing — and oddly compelling —  tone at its onset. Slowly, the guitar fades and gives way to a creeping piano figure that injects the song with an eerie Southern Gothic sensibility. Then, after a brief rest, the song snaps into a sugary overdrive that kicks the energy up from 15 to 80 in an instant.

Following the switch, Dentist falls comfortably into a groove that operates as a pastiche of pop influences from decades long gone. It’s a perfect transition that illustrates the band’s understanding of their craft, suggesting that Dentist’s forthcoming Ceilings may be one of 2016’s most unexpected joys. Apart from the invigorating dynamic shifts of “Joel”, the song’s vibrant second act endearingly instills the song with a surplus of giddy joy. “Joel” ultimately goes from bleakly intimidating to openly welcoming, leaving one hell of an imprint in the process.

It’s another entry in an already-long string of unlikely summer anthem candidates, carefree and just about perfect.

Listen to “Joel” below and pre-order Ceilings from Little Dickman here.


[Editor’s Note: The beginning of coverage in 2016 was an extremely hectic time and one odd quirk of this site was overlooked. That particular oversight will be amended in this post, which precedes the resumption of posting the 100 immediately preceding entries in the continuously-expanding Heartbreaking Bravery catalog of posts. A few of the image links are broken and some of the galleries are missing but all of them will eventually make the migration to Heartbreaking Bravery’s flickr. Keep an eye out.]

To access posts 700-799, click on the links listed below.

HB700: Wrap Up Warm (Mixtape)
HB701: Ronnie Stone & The Lonely Riders – ❤ Race. Cold Sweat. Nu Dance. Do It. (Glassio Remix Premiere)
HB702: Phooey! – Molly’s at the Laundromat (Song Premiere)
HB703: Idle Bloom – Pride Line (Stream, Live Video)
HB704: METZ – Spit You Out (Music Video)
HB705: Alex G – Brite Boy (Music Video)
HB706: Dilly Dally – The Touch (Music Video)
HB707: Dusk – Too Sweet (Music Video)
HB708: Watch This: Vol. 108
HB709: Watch This: Vol. 109
HB710: Watch This: Vol. 110
HB711: Patio – Patio Songs (Demo Review, Stream, Live Video)
HB712: PURPLE 7 – Garden Eyes (Album Review, Stream)
HB713: Milk Crimes – Milk Crimes (EP Review, Stream)
HB714: Bad Wig – Bad Wig (EP Review, Stream, Live Video)
HB715: Beliefs – Colour of Your Name (Stream)
HB716: Bruising – Honey (Stream)
HB717: Lucy Dacus – I Don’t Wanna Be Funny Anymore (Stream)
HB718: Mothers – Too Small For Eyes (Stream)
HB719: Birth (Defects) – Ascetic (Stream)
HB720: Casket Girls – Deep Time (Stream)
HB721: Two Inch Astronaut – Good Behavior (Stream)
HB722: bed. – The Rule (Stream)
HB723: Dark Blue – Delco Runts (Stream)
HB724: A Short Review (Live Video Compilation
HB725: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. I
HB726: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. II
HB727: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. III
HB728: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. IV
HB729: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. V
HB730: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. VI
HB731: 2015: A Visual Retrospective, Vol. VII
HB732: 2015: The Best of Watch This
HB733: 15 of ’15: The Best EP’s of 2015
HB734: 15 of ’15: The Best Music Videos of 2015
HB735: 15 of ’15: The Best Odds and Ends of 2015
HB736: 15 of ’15: The Best Songs of 2015
HB737: 15 of ’15: The Best Albums of 2015
HB738: The Honorable Mentions of the 2015 Music Categories
HB739: The Best Scenes of 2015
HB740: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Loren DiBlasi)
HB741: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Lindsey-Paige McCloy)
HB742: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Sabyn Mayfield)
HB743: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Nicola Leel)
HB744: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Lindsay Hazen)
HB745: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Tica Douglas)
HB746: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Fred Thomas)
HB747: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Phil McAndrew)
HB748: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Isabel Reidy)
HB749: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jessica Leach)
HB750: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Sami Martasian)
HB751: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Ben Grigg)
HB752: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Amanda Dissinger)
HB753: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Bella Mazzetti)
HB754: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (David Anthony)
HB755: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jamie Coletta)
HB756: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Chris Sutter)
HB757: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (John Rossiter)
HB758: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Cole Kinsler)
HB759: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Megan Manowitz)
HB760: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Gabriela June Tully Claymore)
HB761: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Stephen Tringali)
HB762: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Alisa Rodriguez)
HB763: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Toby Reif)
HB764: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (100%)
HB765: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Amelia Pitcherella)
HB766: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Katie Bennett)
HB767: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Miranda Fisher)
HB768: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Christine Varriale)
HB769: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Sam Clark)
HB770: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Julia Leiby)
HB771: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Kelly Johnson)
HB772: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jessi Frick)
HB773: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Nicholas Cummins)
HB774: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Lily Mastrodimos)
HB775: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Jerard Fagerberg)
HB776: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Athylia Paremski)
HB777: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Eric Slick)
HB778: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (David Glickman)
HB779: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories (Ryan Wizniak)
HB780: 2015: A Year’s Worth of Memories
HB781: WASHA – Bury Our Love (Music Video Premiere)
HB782: 2016: The First Two Months (Streams)
HB783: 2016: The First Two Months (Full Streams)
HB784: 2016: The First Two Months (Music Videos)
HB785: Introducing: Ubetcha
HB786: Inside Voices – Nomad:Begin (Song Premiere)
HB787: Watch This: The Honorable Mentions of 2016’s First Quarter
HB788: Horse Teeth – Dark & Gloomy (Song Premiere)
HB789: March 2016: The Full Streams
HB790: March 2016: The Music Videos
HB791: March 2016: The Streams
HB792: Ladada – Hi Five (EP Premiere)
HB793: The 50 Best Songs of 2016’s First Quarter
HB794: The Nudes – Nowhere To Be (Song Premiere)
HB795: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. I
HB796: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. II
HB797: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. III
HB798: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. IV
HB799: Watch This: The Best of 2016’s First Quarter, Vol. V

Lithuania – Kill The Thing You Love (Stream)

eric slick

[Editor’s Note: In light of the tragic circumstances in Orlando, there was some debate over featuring a song with a title that could be construed negatively in the face of that event. However, now more than ever, it seems deeply necessary to endorse and promote acts of kindness, understanding, and empathy. It’s because of this song’s message and the good that can come from its purchase that it’s in today’s headlining spot.]

Since the last post on this site went up just a few short days ago, new tracks emerged from Pari∀h, Deerhoof, Pink Mexico, Guts Club, Blesst Chest, Ali Beletic, Kool A.D., and two new tunes from JOYA‘s Robert Sotelo. Artists with commendable music videos was a list that included The Gotobeds, Wimps, Oddissee, The Figgs, Palehound, Gang of Youths, Terrible Feelings, WALL, and Museyroom. The past several days also saw the release(s) of several legitimate album of the year candidates, including efforts from Told Slant, DEN, The Gotobeds, Margaret GlaspyThe Craters, and a demo of the upcoming full-length debut from Mr. Martin & The Sensitive Guys.

All of the above items amounted to an extraordinary run — especially for the full streams — for such an abbreviated time frame. One of the most heartening things to emerge during that stretch came courtesy of site favorites Lithuania, a band fronted by Dr. Dog drummer and A Year’s Worth of Memories contributor Eric Slick. “Kill The Thing You Love” was originally intended for the band’s latest record, 2015’s astounding Hardcore Friends, but was ultimately nixed for being too out of sync on a thematic level. Fortunately, the song wasn’t just relegated to an unheard archives litter and was recently released as a standalone single to benefit Women Against Abuse, a Philadelphia organization that aids women who are escaping or have survived domestic abuse.

“Kill The Thing You Love” itself is one of the band’s more gnarled, rough-hewn offerings. Relentlessly aggressive in its dynamic approach, the song actually gains a wealth of power from its decidedly direct aesthetics, elevating an oddly moving narrative. Slick delivers the most impassioned vocal delivery of his career and the song uses its lo-fi nature to amplify its own propulsion. In a little over three and a half minutes, the band embraces a chaotic sludge that underlines the confusion that frequently manifests and overpowers the decision-making in relationships that make room for — and frequently try to excuse instances of — domestic abuse. It’s a bold song that calls attention to a dark reality that goes ignored far too often.

Here’s the statement that Slick issued to Post-Trash for the great premiere piece that accompanied the song:

The song “Kill The Thing You Love” was written in 2014. Its intended purpose was for the Hardcore Friends album, but we decided to leave it off because it didn’t fit the narrative. It’s also a complicated listen. However, the song is of great importance to me. It was written from the perspective of a young woman who runs away from her abysmal home life and starts fresh in a safe environment. It’s based on a story that a close friend told me about her incredibly difficult and abusive childhood. “Kill The Thing You Love” is indeed a jarring title, but its intent is more of a mantra of empowerment. Sometimes we have to let go of things (kill in the figurative sense) we love, especially when they’re hurting us. Abuse is still everywhere. A direct example is the inexcusable behavior of Seagreen Records. Seagreen was initially supposed to release this song until they came under fire for very serious sexual abuse charges. I was horrified. Luckily, Lame-O Records agreed to release this song. I’m relieved that we can benefit a great cause in the process.

Listen to “Kill The Thing You Love” below and get the track (and donate to a good cause) here.

Lady Bones – Weight (Stream)

Lady Bones II

Continuing on with the impressive slate of notable songs that have come out since the start of April, the focus falls — as it has so many times on this site in the past — on Lady Bones. Before turning the attention towards their outstanding “Weight”, it’s worth casting a look over at great new songs from Lost Boy ?, Melkbelly, Pumarosa, Henry Chadwick, Ali Beletic, Honey Radar, Stone Cold Fox, King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard, FIR, and Keroscene. While those 10 songs were all more than worthwhile, it was Lady Bones’ “Weight” to snag this post’s feature spot.

Last year’s excellent Dying saw the trio continuing to hone their own take on the grunge-meets-post-punk-filtered-through-noise-punk-trappings sound that has become a calling card for many Boston-area bands. Dying saw the band continue to scale back some of the more pop-leaning aspects that populated their split with Horsehands, to considerable effect. “Weight”, once again, finds the band diminishing their more pop-skewing sensibilities in favor of something much more aggressive. Again, it’s a move that pays dividends for the band.

Now, to be abundantly clear, the band hasn’t sacrificed their keen melodic sense, they’ve just inverted it into something that comes across in a much more emphatic manner. On “Weight” they continue to go for their listener’s throats, conjuring up a bruising number that benefits from their murky tones, never quite becoming a sludge song but playing with some of the genre’s more interesting aesthetics. They’ve settled into a confident rhythm and have found what works most effectively for their songwriting and “Weight” is exhilarating proof.

Listen to “Weight” below and pre-order Terse from Midnight Werewolf here.